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Your employees are 75% more likely to watch a training video than read printed materials, emails, or web text, according to a study by Forrester Research. Company training videos are a great way to share information and ensure your employees stay informed—as long as the videos aren’t boring.

Your Training Video Doesn't Have to Be Boring—Here's How to Liven it Up

30 Nov 2018

Your employees are 75% more likely to watch a training video than read printed materials, emails, or web text, according to a study by Forrester Research. Company training videos are a great way to share information and ensure your employees stay informed—as long as the videos aren’t boring.

At NextThought Studios, we encourage you to break free of the same old format and create compelling training videos that capture the imagination. Here are some ideas to get you thinking.

Go 2D and 3D

Have you considered using animated graphics? 2D and 3D illustrations show concepts beautifully and educationally. They help people gain instant insight into almost any topic.

For example, show an illustrated view of your production process that teaches your employees how your products are manufactured. Do things that can’t be done in real life, like freeze-frame or high speed.

Graphics offer eye-catching movement and vibrant color, etching an unforgettable picture in the minds of your employees. Psychologists have found that graphics help people remember things effortlessly, without even realizing that they’re learning.

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Use Detailed Views

Through careful filming and special effects, you can show detailed views that make your training videos more effective. Detail shots quickly train your employees on complex tasks. Show precise parts up-close and demonstrate complicated assembly procedures.

For example, at the Tesla vehicle manufacturing facility in Fremont, California, new employees go through a rigorous training process that includes viewing Teslas on the assembly line, doing hands-on work, and watching videos that methodically reiterate what they’ve just seen.

How could your company use detailed views in training videos? Could you explore the inner workings of your products? Could you demonstrate how customers are supposed to assemble your products, so your salespeople can better understand the experience? The possibilities are almost endless.

Add Aerial Videography

You can also go big and show things from 10,000 feet. Using aerial and drone videography, take your audience on a large-scale journey across terrain or into remote areas.

Drone videos help your employees “think big” and view things in a new way. Many companies are using them to push the boundaries of ordinary thinking.

Look at PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), the London-based accounting firm. Instead of a traditional training program, they’ve enrolled their workforce in a new type of digital training that teaches tech and drone skills.

Why would a company train accountants with drones? According to their digital talent leader, Sarah McEneaney, they’re doing it to “future proof” their workforce. They want to ensure the old-fashioned business of accounting can transition easily into the next century—and that takes flexible thinkers.

Introduce Character Narrators

Teach employees with cartoon characters? Wait, wait, give us a chance to explain.

Animated characters actually have a place in the workplace.


They are proven to keep the audience’s attention and make them feel more receptive to hearing new information.


They make an emotional connection that even humans can’t make.

That’s why spokes-characters like the Geico gecko and the Snuggle bear enjoy an enduring popularity. Sure, we sometimes roll our eyes at them and chuckle—but in the process, we’re listening to them and remembering what they have to say.

If a spokes-character doesn’t seem to be a fit for your business, consider using other kinds of animations that reinforce your messages: animated logos, products that come to life, animated clips, visual storytelling, and motion graphics.

You can also use human narrators that have friendly, vibrant personalities. Work with a video production company that uses actors who do corporate training videos. They can present information in an upbeat and engaging way.

Interactive Quizzes and Games

Another way to liven up your video is to add quizzes and games that boost interactivity for your audience. Arrange your video into short segments and add a quiz at the end of each segment. Or, end the entire video with a big quiz that reviews what they’ve learned.

Training videos can also use gamification, or game-based education. When you gamify a video, you use the concepts behind the world’s most popular video games to boost learning and retention.

For example, you can create a visual treasure hunt that helps people seek out concepts and understand them. Immerse your audience in a virtual world that’s not only educational but also fun.

Immersive and gamified training videos are very popular with employees. You’ll likely find that they’re clamoring for another one, eager to see what kind of video experience you’re bringing them next.

Next Step: NextThought Studios

Are you getting excited about making a training video? So are we. NextThought Studios has made thousands of training videos for all kinds of companies.

Videos keep your employees engaged, motivated, and educated. Our team of training video experts can bring your ideas to life. Connect with NextThought Studios for a quote, and let’s start brainstorming.

 

How Can Your Corporate Training Be Improved With Video?



About the Author

Max Bevan, B.B.A

Max heads Business Development for NextThought Studios and is a video marketing specialist with an in-depth knowledge of marketing trends and a comprehensive background in video production. He has a direct eye for creating innovative and entertaining videos with commercial appeal as part of high-impact marketing campaigns. Having worked on videography projects for the University of Oklahoma and Gaylord Hall Productions, Max now uses his in-depth knowledge to help clients understand how to use video elements to tell their stories. Max is noted for being adaptive to any situation, and he specializes in sales and client relationships.

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